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photo tutorial for velvet pumpkins

September 25, 2012

Notes: I decided to try and present directions best I could since I had so many requests for instructions.  I hope this helps.  I think part of the success of this project is to have a beautiful velvet.  I used a silk velvet.  As much as I love white, I think the velvet fabric colors that show depth are more beautiful – you can’t really see depth in the white.  They did not carry silk velvet at the local craft store or many of the fabric stores.  I was able to find it at a fabric store in Norwalk, CT called Banksville Designer Fabrics (www.banksvilledesignerfabrics.com).  I am sure there must be some sources online also, but I didn’t check.  Banksville had a half yard minimum which cost $12.50.  With a half yard you can probably make approximately twenty 7″ pumpkins.  A 5 lb. bag of rice would probably be sufficient for a dozen pumpkins.  Rice is pretty inexpensive, so if you plan on making a lot of pumpkins, buy a huge bag.  Stems can be found at pumpkin farms from unwanted pumpkins or squash.  I think the crazier stems you can find, the better – the stem can really add personality to the pumpkin.  If you don’t have any farms nearby, you can purchase a small pumpkin for a $1 at a grocery store if you have no other way to get a stem.  I think part of the beauty of these pumpkins are the real stems, but I have seen people use sticks from trees or cinnamon sticks on fabric pumpkins.  I think driftwood would be a fun option.  Of course, you can use the same procedure  I demonstrate to make pumpkins from other fabrics.   If you aren’t crafty or would rather purchase some really beautiful velvet pumpkins rather than make them, look at http://www.hotskwash.com/hot-skwash-online-store/ .  This is the company that made the pumpkins that inspired me to try and create some and they sell them in an amazing array of colors.  If you have any questions on how I created mine, please send me an email and I would be happy to help you out! 

Thanks for visiting, Jackie

Category: diy | Tags: , | 7 comments

  • Holly says:

    I have found if you sew the pumpkin with fishing line (10 lb test) it is easier to pull the top tightly together and there is no risk of the thread breaking. I use a large needle designed for making stuffed toys.

    • jackie says:

      Thank you so much for this comment Holly! I actually have been using fishing line…this post was written some time ago. I appreciate you adding this tip!! Yes, I find you can be much rougher in handling the fishing line than thread! What color fabric is your favorite?

  • Kristina says:

    Dear Jackie,
    I am going to create my first pumpkin, but can not decide on fabric. I read, that silk viscose velvet is preferable due to nicer folding in compare to synthetic. I was also wondering, if it is important to have a bit of stretch in fabric? There are plenty of offers for synthetic velvet online and in stores, however it is not so easy to find stretch silk viscose velvet in variable colours… It is also much more expensive… Thank you in advance for your reply! Kind regards, Kristina

    • jackie says:

      Kristina – I would not worry about the stretch – it is not the stretch, but the way the fabric folds that I believe makes it beautiful. I like the silk velvet. I did not use a fabric with stretch. You can use this method to make pumpkins in many different fabrics. Once you complete your first one, I know you will be hooked! Send me a photo of the first one finished! xo

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